Public Perception of Sasquatch

Posted by: Craig Woolheater on November 28th, 2016

2016/2017 presentation by John Bindernagel on his research of Sasquatch.

Presented at the 2016 Sasquatch Summit.

About Craig Woolheater
Co-founder of Cryptomundo in 2005. I have appeared in or contributed to the following TV programs, documentaries and films: OLN's Mysterious Encounters: "Caddo Critter", Southern Fried Bigfoot, Travel Channel's Weird Travels: "Bigfoot", History Channel's MonsterQuest: "Swamp Stalker", The Wild Man of the Navidad, Destination America's Monsters and Mysteries in America: Texas Terror - Lake Worth Monster, Animal Planet's Finding Bigfoot: Return to Boggy Creek and Beast of the Bayou.


4 Responses to “Public Perception of Sasquatch”

  1. Becho responds:

    I’ve read the book that Dr. Bindernagel held up over and over again. It’s a very good book that puts Sasquatch in a historical context with past discoveries. It also addresses our cultural belief system that prevents this discovery from being accepted in the mainstream.

    I know that where I live they seem to migrate no more than a few tens of miles for food sources and these are in very isolated areas. So, in my experience they don’t move that much from home and therefore are very rarely exposed crossing highways, for instance.

    They are also highly intelligent and therefore don’t make a lot of mistakes and get seen.

    They are real beings and accepted as more than just myth among the local tribes of indigenous people. How so many can have encounters and similar descriptions of physical appearance and habits and still be thought of as some kind of pseudo-science is now beyond me at this point. But I also understand that I was a skeptic less than six years ago.

    I had Dr. Jeff Meldrum ask me “How can you tell who is who out there if your not seeing them?” It is because they sound very familiar, almost human. If I blindfolded you and put you in a room with a family of four who spoke another language, do you think you could tell who is young and who is an adult, who is female and who is male? For the most part you could. It’s that simple. I’ve had many tell me that I can’t possibly learn anything about a mythical beast until it’s recognized by science. So what I’m hearing is when it’s proven and recognized by science then and only then can I have any idea what I’m dealing with and therefore what I’m learning about. That is nonsense. I am having frequent interaction and learning about them without the sanction of science.

    What I’m doing has nothing to do with the inner politics of science. I’ll leave that up to those who must deal with that culture. I have less interaction with scientists and their culture than I do with Sasquatch. I prefer it that way. Also this passion of mine has only emptied my pockets of money. I will write a book someday or maybe sell a Bigfoot song sometime and recoup some of my money, but I’m not really concerned about that. So why? Because it is utterly fascinating.

  2. Goodfoot responds:

    “I know that where I live they seem to migrate no more than a few tens of miles for food sources and these are in very isolated areas. So, in my experience they don’t move that much from home and therefore are very rarely exposed crossing highways, for instance.”

    I would exercise caution in applying your local case in a macro manner. Food is probably plentiful year-round where you live. However, I would warn that every Bigfoot population may not be so blessed, and may have to range much further to survive. Not every population may have the luxury of living in such a locale.

  3. Goodfoot responds:

    I love where he realized that his voice and tone were rising, and he regained control.

    Anger and frustration are an everyday part of this discipline, and I personally have little problem with tone and language escalation when confronted with rigid defense of what people mistakenly regard as “science”.

  4. Becho responds:

    I would agree with that Goodfoot and that is why I said in my experience. I live in such a lush part of the country that there would be no need for migration for resources, other than to move to where they can harvest early berries and fish runs. I believe it might be different up in Alaska and Canada, where they might start south and follow the berries as they ripen going north, for instance.




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