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Rediscovered: 3 Extinct Amphibians

Posted by: Loren Coleman on September 24th, 2010

Two frogs and a salamander have been rediscovered during a worldwide quest to find extinct amphibians. The finds have included a Mexican salamander not seen since it was discovered in 1941, a frog from the Ivory Coast not seen since 1967 and another frog from Democratic Republic of Congo not seen since 1979.


The Mount Nimba Reed Frog (Hyperolius nimbae), Ivory Coast, was last seen in 1967. Also called the Omaniundu reed frog, it is a small and well camouflaged brown frog, and was rediscovered by local scientist N’Goran Kouame from the University of Abobo-Adjame.


Last seen in 1979, this beautiful frog with bright green – almost fluorescent looking – spots on a dark brown background, was rediscovered by Jos Kielgast from The Natural History Museum of Denmark.


The Cave Splayfoot Salamander (Chiropterotriton mosaueri), Hidalgo Province, Mexico, had not been seen since its initial discovery of a single individual in 1941. The pink footed, brown salamander is believed to live underground in cave systems. Sean Rovito from the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, found some in a cave system that is only accessible by going down to it via a large pothole.

Conservation International worked with 600 amphibian specialists around the world to compile a list of species that hadn’t been seen in more than 10 years, then provided funding to 40 expeditions — mostly involving local researchers — to search for them.

For more, see here and here.

Loren Coleman – has written 5491 posts on this site.
Loren Coleman is one of the world’s leading cryptozoologists, some say “the” leading. Certainly, he is acknowledged as the current living American researcher and writer who has most popularized cryptozoology in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Starting his fieldwork and investigations in 1960, after traveling and trekking extensively in pursuit of cryptozoological mysteries, Coleman began writing to share his experiences in 1969. An honorary member of Ivan T. Sanderson’s Society for the Investigation of the Unexplained in the 1970s, Coleman has been bestowed with similar honorary memberships of the North Idaho College Cryptozoology Club in 1983, and in subsequent years, that of the British Columbia Scientific Cryptozoology Club, CryptoSafari International, and other international organizations. He was also a Life Member and Benefactor of the International Society of Cryptozoology (now-defunct). Loren Coleman’s daily blog, as a member of the Cryptomundo Team, served as an ongoing avenue of communication for the ever-growing body of cryptozoo news from 2005 through 2013.


One Response to “Rediscovered: 3 Extinct Amphibians”

  1. mystery_man responds:

    This is exciting news. There has been a dramatic increase in the decline and extinction of amphibian species in recent years, so to be finding new ones, and in particular ones previously thought to be extinct that are still hanging on, is welcome news indeed.

    Amphibian species tend to be a good barometer for the overall health of an ecosystem and their sudden decline can be seen as sort of like a canary in the mines, a harbinger of trouble within a habitat. The problems could be many; climate change, pollution, the impact of invasive species, however amphibian species are often the first to show the early negative effects. If the amphibians are still around, that tends to suggest that the ecosystem is still in generally good health.

    I always welcome any new amphibian discoveries such as these because they mean that not only are the amphibians surviving, but the habitat as a whole is healthy.

    Good stuff.



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