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More on Caatinga Woodpecker

Posted by: Loren Coleman on June 14th, 2008

The following is the uncropped version of the photograph, via the BBC:

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A lost bird returns. The Caatinga Woodpecker (Celeus obrieni) had not been seen since its discovery in 1926 when Advaldo do Prado came across this one in eastern central Brazil. The country has more globally threatened species than any other. (Image: Guilherme R C Silva/BirdLife)

Let us hope for as clear new evidence of the ivory-billed woodpecker will be developed soon.

My thanks to Arthur Masloski.

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Update from Mount Desert Islander.

I found an article in Portugese with two nice pictures at this web site.

From the look of the second picture there is a mirror being used to light the subject. Both images are of superior quality to the one used in the story above. The second picture answers many questions for me.

It’s worth a look.

Caatinga Woodpecker

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About Loren Coleman
Loren Coleman is one of the world’s leading cryptozoologists, some say “the” leading. Certainly, he is acknowledged as the current living American researcher and writer who has most popularized cryptozoology in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Starting his fieldwork and investigations in 1960, after traveling and trekking extensively in pursuit of cryptozoological mysteries, Coleman began writing to share his experiences in 1969. An honorary member of Ivan T. Sanderson’s Society for the Investigation of the Unexplained in the 1970s, Coleman has been bestowed with similar honorary memberships of the North Idaho College Cryptozoology Club in 1983, and in subsequent years, that of the British Columbia Scientific Cryptozoology Club, CryptoSafari International, and other international organizations. He was also a Life Member and Benefactor of the International Society of Cryptozoology (now-defunct). Loren Coleman’s daily blog, as a member of the Cryptomundo Team, served as an ongoing avenue of communication for the ever-growing body of cryptozoo news from 2005 through 2013.


7 Responses to “More on Caatinga Woodpecker”

  1. MountDesertIslander responds:

    Bravo on “re-discovering” a lost bird. That is a great accomplishment and a source of hope for other “lost” species.

  2. Rogutaan responds:

    Its always good to learn about things thought extinct are in fact not.

  3. ETxArtist responds:

    Does anyone else think the photo of the bird on the guy’s hand looks Photoshopped? I’m no expert, but to me it looks like the bird doesn’t quite look natural. And why would a guy be holding a really rare species?

  4. ARO responds:

    wow even the uncropped version looks extremely photoshopped!

  5. maslo63 responds:

    If the pictures were PhotoShopped I would be curious to know where the hoaxer got a photograph of a live Caatinga Woodpecker to use. I believe these are authentic.

  6. breenie responds:

    Not only is this photoshopped, its really badly photoshopped. This screams “fake”.

  7. semillama responds:

    It’s really funny to read all these “photoshopped!” comments. What exactly is photoshopped? What people are having a problem with is the seeming difference in brightness between the subjects and the background, but the subjects are being artificially lit on an already bright day. It’s highly possible that the subjects were under an open-sided tent for shelter from the sun while handling the bird, which would account for the need for artificial lighting.

    As to why would someone be handling the bird, as I said in my previous post on the subject, the bird was in all probability caught while researchers were using a mist net to band birds during their survey. It’s standard practice.

    Not every photo is a fake.



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