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YouTube Johor

Posted by: Loren Coleman on November 11th, 2006

Vincent Chow Bigfoot

People might wish to view YouTube’s Malaysian Bigfoot video, which is an extract from Jonathan Kent’s BBC report on the subject. The drawings of what the sighted Johor Bigfoot looked like, have a bulky appearance to them, and are worth the viewing alone.

There is also footage of Vincent Chow (above) on the YouTube clip. Kent shows footprints discovered along a creek too.

My thanks to the anonymous Cryptomundo contributor for pointing to this.

About Loren Coleman
Loren Coleman is one of the world’s leading cryptozoologists, some say “the” leading. Certainly, he is acknowledged as the current living American researcher and writer who has most popularized cryptozoology in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. Starting his fieldwork and investigations in 1960, after traveling and trekking extensively in pursuit of cryptozoological mysteries, Coleman began writing to share his experiences in 1969. An honorary member of Ivan T. Sanderson’s Society for the Investigation of the Unexplained in the 1970s, Coleman has been bestowed with similar honorary memberships of the North Idaho College Cryptozoology Club in 1983, and in subsequent years, that of the British Columbia Scientific Cryptozoology Club, CryptoSafari International, and other international organizations. He was also a Life Member and Benefactor of the International Society of Cryptozoology (now-defunct). Loren Coleman’s daily blog, as a member of the Cryptomundo Team, served as an ongoing avenue of communication for the ever-growing body of cryptozoo news from 2005 through 2013.


5 Responses to “YouTube Johor”

  1. bambookid responds:

    Anything that Chow touches is tainted, in my eyes. I am not an expert by far, but the tracks in the video look more like hippo, than an ape-like creature.

    Vincent, you sure laid a blow to research in Malaysia…

  2. shovethenos responds:

    I haven’t sat down and fleshed out the particulars of the whole story, but it appears that Chow was somewhat duped by the guys that had the pictures – they sort of controlled the flow of information about the pictures. So the impression that I get is that Chow seems more like a victim of the hoax than a hoaxster. I could be wrong, however.

  3. Loren Coleman responds:

    There is no other conclusion, based upon the events that unfolded and were revealed, than to think Vincent Chow was the victim of the photographic hoax.

    To consider all the evidence before the photo events as tainted by Chow is short-sighted and not supported by what actually happened. Chow allegedly may be guilty of being too gullible around some findings. But any notion that he was responsible for any manufactured tracks, cooked sightings, or fake pictures is just not part of my understanding of the real history of the Johor Bigfoot.

  4. Dudlow responds:

    I actually feel badly for Chow. He appears to have been well intentioned but naively victimized, just as the reading public was in turn duped. And to see Chow soldiering onward now, as if eternally hopeful, regardless, must say something about his stick-to-it-ive-ness. I just hope for all our sakes that past experience has taught him to be a better detective.

    But gosh, it does almost seem downright conspiratorial, the way in which virtually every hopeful bit of BF news over the past few years has died a controversial death.

  5. czenquirer responds:

    To continue the point made by bambookid, the road tracks look to me as if they might have been made by a Malayan tapir.



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