Animals & Men: Issue 51

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Just a couple of days ago, I received a copy of the new issue (No. 51) of the Center for Fortean Zoology’s in-house magazine Animals & Men.

As always it’s an excellent issue, and professionally published, with a full-color, glossy, card cover and dozens of interior, color photos too.

Highlights of the new issue (which runs to 50 pages) include:

1. A round-up of cryptozoological news;
2. An article on the recent CFZ expedition to Tasmania, in search of surviving Thylacines;
3. A feature on the latest CFZ quest to find the Orang Pendek of Sumatra;
4. A review of the CFZ’s latest Weird Weekend conference;
5. Various book reviews;
6. And Corinna Downes’ Watcher of the Skies column.

If all of that has got you interested in subscribing to the magazine, contact the editor (and CFZ head-honcho) Jon Downes right here.

Commenting on the Thylacine

The last Tasmanian Tigers in captivity.

The last Tasmanian Tigers in captivity.

“The thylacine is not extinct. I say this without reservation. I don’t suppose the thylacine (or Tasmanian tiger) remains extant, or imagine, or even hope it is; I know categorically that the thylacine exists, because I have seen it in the flesh. I have also heard it and smelt it over the past 20 years and handled some mighty convincing eyewitness reports along the way.”

Got your interest? Read on…

CFZ-Thylacine Update

CFZ Oz

This just in from the Center for Fortean Zoology’s Richard Freeman, in an email to CFZ Director Jon Downes on the current developments in their search for surviving thylacines in Tasmania:

“Hi mate,

“THIS IS THE FIRST OPPORTUNITY I HAVE GOT TO E-MAIL.

“We are in a very remote area. Baiting camera traps has shown up a healthy population of Tasmanian devils. No thylacines yet. Have seen devils, pademelons, Bennett’s wallabies, wombats, echidnas, potoroos, ring tailed and bush tailed possums, tiger snakes, cockatoos, wedge tailed eagles, native hens and many others.

“Interviewed thylacine witnesses, one was a government licensed shooter who controls wallaby numbers. He saw the animal twice, he also knew a forestry worker who saw one. All these were in the north-east. The owner of a tea rooms and garden saw one in central Tasmania. Many more sightings uncovered by Tony Healy ranging from 1982 to 2012.

“The terrain is very wild and the human population near non-existent. I am in no doubt of the thylacine’s continued survival.

“Talking to a guide recently who has heard the vocalizations, a high pitched yip-yip-yip. Even the once hard boiled sceptic Nick Mooney is coming around to realizing that something is here. Already planning next year’s expedition. Sightings mainly in north-east and north-west but massive wilderness area with no roads or people in the south-west. Prey populations are huge, plenty of living space.

“Still hope to see a tazzy wolf. Rich”

CFZ Thylacine Expedition

There’s a new post from me at Mysterious Universe on the always controversial issue of whether or not the thylacine still lives. It starts like this…

“From Australia’s Courier Mail newspaper… ‘An international team of naturalists from the Centre for Fortean Zoology has arrived in Tasmania for the first in a series of well-resourced and professional expeditions into Tasmania’s wilderness to hunt for evidence of the Tasmanian tiger. Although the animal was officially declared extinct in the 1980s, reports of thylacine sightings are still common and expedition leader Mike Williams from NSW has high hopes that they can find something. ‘The problem with a lot of the sightings from members of the public is that they’re generally caught by surprise, and their photos are taken on things like mobile phones and aren’t very good,’ he said.

“If the Center for Fortean Zoology’s expedition does indeed uncover evidence that the thylacine really is still with us (albeit with us in an incredibly stealthy fashion!), it would be amazing news. After all, not only is the creature widely believed to have become extinct way back in the 1930s, but it was a truly weird-looking animal, too. On top of that, I’m pretty sure that such a discovery would prove to be a major step in encouraging quests to uncover additional, presumed-extinct beasts, too, as well as the definitive unknowns, such as Bigfoot and the Loch Ness Monster.”

Seeking the Thylacine

The last Tasmanian Tigers in captivity.

The last Tasmanian Tigers in captivity.

From Australia’s Courier Mail newspaper…

“An international team of naturalists from the Centre for Fortean Zoology has arrived in Tasmania for the first in a series of well-resourced and professional expeditions into Tasmania’s wilderness to hunt for evidence of the Tasmanian tiger.

“Although the animal was officially declared extinct in the 1980s, reports of thylacine sightings are still common and expedition leader Mike Williams from NSW has high hopes that they can find something.

“‘The problem with a lot of the sightings from members of the public is that they’re generally caught by surprise, and their photos are taken on things like mobile phones and aren’t very good,’ he said.”

If, like me, you think there is a very good chance indeed that the thylacine is not extinct after all, you may want to keep watch for any and all developments in this story. I’ll be posting updates as I receive them from the CFZ’s Jon Downes.