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Livestock Mutilations In Ohio

Posted by: Craig Woolheater on June 12th, 2013

Butler County, Ohio has been the recent scene of some disturbing livestock mutilations. Two miniature horses named Blaze and Buck were found hacked to death last week on a stretch of pasture near what is known as Springfield Road situated near the Indiana state line. They had been known to be missing since May 23.

The owners Augustin and Yolanda Gama-Martinez, said their children were playing near the fence where the animals were found when they said they smelled something awful. They found one of the bodies intact, while the other’s head was found some 30 yards from the body.

Incidentally, this is very near the same spot where, on May 9, four sheep were found hacked to death, along with four more sheep and two other horses that were severely injured. Outside investigators have been trying to get more information on the incidents but no one close to the situation is talking much.

The partially decomposed bodies of the two horses left no clue as to how they actually died. Local law enforcement is obviously stumped and claiming it was probably coyotes, but local residents aren’t convinced. And some are convinced it’s more likely the work of some disturbed human(s).

Brittany Kolb, 27, who’s sheep were killed last month claimed there has been no problems with coyotes in the area. She believes whatever killed her sheep is also responsible for these killings. The rest of her animals that were injured by stab wounds at that time, received care, and are now recovering. Since these incidents, she is boarding her animals at another location.

Since the bodies were described as being hacked or having stab wounds and the bodies did not appear to have been eaten, also deflects from the coyote theory. Kolb said, “(The wounds) are pretty wide, very deep, like you can put your hand in them.” She also said she originally believed the wounds may have been inflicted by an axe or hatchet. Though some have claimed over the years that coyotes kill “for the fun of killing,” they don’t generally inflict stab wounds and sever heads from their bodies without great difficulty. And even if coyotes didn’t eat their prey, something else most surely would, especially if the animals had been lying dead for a while.

At any rate, it has everyone in this normally quiet rural area spooked. Children are being severely restricted in their outside play time, and pets are being kept under watch also. And the incidents may remain a mystery indefinitely and leave the local residents disturbed for a long time to come.

“We’ve had animals for eight years in that field,” Kolb said. “And never had a problem with coyotes, and so have these people. Now all of a sudden, they have dead horses. It’s pretty ironic to me.”

Originally published on The Crypto Crew

About Craig Woolheater
Co-founder of Cryptomundo in 2005. I have appeared in or contributed to the following TV programs, documentaries and films: OLN's Mysterious Encounters: "Caddo Critter", Southern Fried Bigfoot, Travel Channel's Weird Travels: "Bigfoot", History Channel's MonsterQuest: "Swamp Stalker", The Wild Man of the Navidad Destination America's Monsters and Mysteries in America: Texas Terror - Lake Worth Monster.


5 Responses to “Livestock Mutilations In Ohio”

  1. mandors responds:

    Sounds like a proto-serial killer. Hope they catch him.

  2. hoodoorocket responds:

    I agree 100% with Mandors assessment.

    If there were pictures of the wounds, they would probably indicate what type weapon was used. Sounds more like machete or sword than an ax from the article, but the description is vague on details.

    Knowing the weapon might point towards the culprit.

    Serial slaughter of large animals is most likely the middle step between killing small animals and killing humans. Definitely a sign of a sociopath with no capacity for empathy.

    First place to start looking is troubled students/dropouts in the middle schools and high schools, then move on to area farm hands younger than 25 years old.

    Unless they are living way off the beaten path, their inability to assimilate with society will have caused a series of incidents that have escalated to this and these incidents are most likely a matter of record in schools and police ledgers.

    Definitely a solvable crime that demands attention. Once the culprit graduates to killing humans, they will be much harder to catch.

  3. hoodoorocket responds:

    Before reading this, I had mountain lion lined up as a suspect, but the story didn’t bear that out.

    For those of you interested in determining the culprit of predator attacks here is an excellent at-a-glance resource.

  4. volmar responds:

    99% of the cattle mutalations are the work of canids (either dogs, wolves or coyotes). Now, if the animals were really hacked to pieces, this is probably the work of a very disturbed human being…

  5. ddschneider1972 responds:

    I found this link to the Cincinnati News Stations story.

    I was actually on that road shown on the map a couple weeks ago taking pictures of some of the supposedly haunted cemeteries.
    Growing up in Butler County, the legend was Reilly was haunted and a hot bed of Satanists, but this attack doesn’t seem ritualistic, and those rumors always were unsubstantiated.

    According to BFRO there were reports of Sasquatch 5.5 miles away in June 2001 (Sighted by 2 witnesses) and July 2002 (Vocalizations and prints). But I haven’t heard of a hatchet or knife wielding Bigfoot that hacks animals…now that leads to all sorts of nightmares.



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