Does Bigfoot Hibernate?

Posted by: Craig Woolheater on December 27th, 2014

Join Michael (Merchant) for a brief walk in the forest and discuss the timeless question. Does Bigfoot hibernate in the winter? Highlights include giant coyote tracks, a tree break (you decide the cause), deer, porcupine scat and a close encounter with a Snowshoe Hare. Two hibernation trees are visited as well.

About Craig Woolheater
Co-founder of Cryptomundo in 2005. I have appeared in or contributed to the following TV programs, documentaries and films: OLN's Mysterious Encounters: "Caddo Critter", Southern Fried Bigfoot, Travel Channel's Weird Travels: "Bigfoot", History Channel's MonsterQuest: "Swamp Stalker", The Wild Man of the Navidad, Destination America's Monsters and Mysteries in America: Texas Terror - Lake Worth Monster, Animal Planet's Finding Bigfoot: Return to Boggy Creek and Beast of the Bayou.


7 Responses to “Does Bigfoot Hibernate?”

  1. SirWilhelm responds:

    I think it depends on where their habitats are. Where their habitats are isolated, or relatively hard to get to, especially in the winter, like in Alaska, I think they stay active, because they know there are no, or few, humans that can see what signs they leave. In more accessible areas, I believe they migrate, either to more hospitable, seasonal, climes, or to less accessible areas, where there is still enough food to support them. They probably do become less active, to conserve energy, like, even humans, tend to do in the winter, where winter’s are particularly harsh, but, I don’t think they hibernate, per se.

  2. xzorter responds:

    Craig,
    Good question, but that’s not the point! In my opinion it’s you filming outside, talking and contemplating things in the WOODS !
    I hope you you realize there are thousands of us ,cooped up, and just seeing someone ,anyone out there, doing it, It just makes my day.
    More ! More ! More ! Outside filming. Even if your just talking about the article you just wrote.
    Thanks.

  3. Doug responds:

    Only dwarf lemurs do (during hot dry season). Apes or monkeys not at all, so I doubt hominids (relic or otherwise) hibernate either.

  4. Goodfoot responds:

    I am not aware of any primates that hibernate, so that informs my opinion that it’s very unlikely that they do. As SirWilhelm pointed out, they may well become inactive to conserve calories in the form of body fat. But “Bigfoot” and “body fat” are not words we’re used to hearing together. I think they probably do sleep a lot in winter, as most of us would do if we found ourselves deeply snowed into a remote mountain cabin.

    I don’t think Bigfoots migrate as such, either. I think they have a “home range” that is probably vast, and they travel north and south within it, as the seasons dictate. The home range may become elastic now and then due to food pressure, human encroachment and at mating time. It seems to me their most effective mating strategy is an annual “meeting of the tribes” (or “Bigfoot Hoedown”). This would necessarily be in some truly remote location, so as to avoid “harshing the mood” by human presence.

    I feel that adults probably mate for life, barring something like the death of a mate, so the “hoedown” would be for adolescents of the families to find a mate, and insure genetic variety, an all-important consideration for our humongous, hairy friends.

  5. Jaded1 responds:

    Just an observation but this site is now almost totally dominated by Bigfoot stories. What happened to all the other cryptids?

  6. Insanity responds:

    The only primates that are known to hibernate are a few dwarf lemur species and the gray mouse lemur (Microcebus murinus), which sometimes does enter a seasonal torpor. Whether or not a hominin could also hibernate is unknown. Body mass would not seem to be a limit as bears do hibernate. Who knows, might be a possibility, but perhaps unlikely.

  7. dconstrukt responds:

    lol…. this question is like what came first the chicken or the egg?

    how on earth can you answer this and actually think for a second you’re remotely correct?

    you haven’t even proven this thing is real.




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